Monthly Archives: July 2012

how to read and note an academic book – part two – slicing and dicing

So you’ve now picked out the book that you want to read in some detail. As I’ve suggested, you don’t want to read every book in the same way. There are some that can immediately be skimmed, others engaged with … Continue reading

Posted in academic book, argument, backward mapping, note-taking, reading, structure | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

blank and blind spots in empirical research

It is important when writing about research to get clear about the difference between research that is inadequate and research that is partial. There are two concepts that are helpful in deciding which of these is the case. They are: … Continue reading

Posted in blank spot, blind spot, claims, Jon Wagner, knowledge production, last chapter, research project, thesis | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

how to read an academic book part one – or – first of all find your mango

Mangoes are my favorite fruit. In fact I think they are my very favorite food. The part I like best about the mango is not the plump cheeks – although they are of course completely delicious – but rather what’s … Continue reading

Posted in academic book, choosing a book, reading | Tagged , , , | 7 Comments

the importance of doing your homework

I’ve just been involved in selecting for a postdoctoral bursary and a PhD studentship. In both instances some of the people who applied had good ideas, the kinds of track records that garnered attention, and wrote well structured applications about … Continue reading

Posted in conversation, homework, job interview, postdoc, scholarship, synergies | Tagged , , , , | 6 Comments

can you write about mess in your thesis and if so how? part two

Peter Matthews continues his post about writing about the messy bits of his research. In my previous post I reported the “positive story” of my fieldwork – reflecting on that feeling of “connection” with my research participants in the narrative … Continue reading

Posted in crafting writing, Dr, informants, publishing, reflection, research methods, rules of engagement, snowball sample, thesis | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

can you write about mess in your thesis, and if so, how? part one

This post is written by Dr Peter Matthews who works in the School of the Built Environment at Herriott Watt. Peter’s blog is Urbanity…History and he tweets as @urbaneprofessor. I asked him to show and tell how he talked about … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, interview, mess, PhD, reflection, research methods, thesis | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

doctoral training and the messiness of research

This post is written by Simon Bailey, a Research Fellow in the Business School at the University of Manchester. As a unique contribution to knowledge, doctorates are by definition very individual things. Though planning is very important, plans must be … Continue reading

Posted in doctoral education, learning, mess, PhD, research methods, research project, scholarly identity | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment