Monthly Archives: December 2012

this academic life – no New Year resolutions, but definitely some reflections and a plan

I don’t have a lot of time for New Year’s resolutions. I don’t spend my time vowing that this will be the year I’ll go back to the gym/stop buying new shoes/finish reading Zizek. At this time of year, I … Continue reading

Posted in calendar, collaboration, conference papers, New Year, planning, planning a paper | Tagged , , , | 6 Comments

the christmas list

I like a good list. I like the order of it, the sense of things to get done and cross off. I woke up early this morning knowing that I had to make a list because it’s nearly Christmas, the … Continue reading

Posted in academic life, Christmas list, time, work | Tagged , , , | 5 Comments

conclusion mise-en-place. christmas present six

Any of you who watch cooking programmes will know the cheffy talk about mise-en-place. It’s a term used to describe all the various kinds of preparation that need to be done in order to whip up something that can be … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, conclusion, contribution, implications of research, mise-en-place | Tagged , , , , | 7 Comments

what not to do in a thesis conclusion, part one: christmas present five

The conclusion is one of the most important sections of the thesis, yet it is often done quite badly. This is not good because the conclusion is a key part of the text and thesis writers really need to spend … Continue reading

Posted in claims, conclusion, introduction, literature review, thesis | Tagged , , | 9 Comments

how not to fail the PhD: christmas present four

The most common way to fail a PhD is not to submit it. Or not to hand in the major revisions. It’s pretty rare for people to actually fail PhDs once they are submitted. The kinds of figures that get … Continue reading

Posted in failing, passing, the good thesis, thesis | Tagged , , , , | 9 Comments

using metacommentary to specify your contribution: christmas present three

A metacommentary is the term used to describe a narrative which directs the reader’s attention to the text’s purpose and positioning. According to Graf and Birkenstein (2010), the function of a metacommentary is akin to that of a Greek Chorus … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, introduction, meta-commentary | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

a lit review thinking tool – christmas present two

Working with literatures is a complex task. It is one of the places where doctoral and early career researchers come unstuck. One of the very many reasons that it’s problematic is, in my view, because there is not sufficient discussion … Continue reading

Posted in literature mapping, literature review, literature themes, note-taking, scholarly primitives, thinking tool, writing | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

writing a road map – christmas present one

During December I thought I would offer some short writing ‘hacks’, that can be used for practising particular aspects of academic writing. These will be in the form of ‘meta texts’, where the original content has been stripped out to … Continue reading

Posted in academic writing, introduction, meta-text, sentence skeleton, signposts | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

finding the time to blog

How do you get time to blog and tweet? This is a question I get asked a lot, as I’m sure other academic bloggers do too. The question is often accompanied by some kind of unspoken criticism. It’s as if … Continue reading

Posted in academic blogging, leisure, social surplus, time, work | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

our paper on academic blogging: using powerpoint as a planning tool

Thesis Whisperer and I have been researching for a paper we are giving at a forthcoming conference. it’s about academic blogging and you can read our initial abstract here. We divided the researching task into two and Inger ‘found’ and … Continue reading

Posted in academic blogging, argument, blogging, blogging taxonomy, planning a paper, powerpoint | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments